Remove Standing Water!

A small amount of standing water will serve the purpose for mosquitoes to breed.  Mosquito eggs and larvae can develop in any amount of standing water....

West Nile Virus Stats

As of Oct. 23, 2013, 91 cases and 10 deaths from West Nile virus had been reported in Illinois.  Cases in the 6-county area:  Cook, 47 (5 deaths); DuPage, 4; Lake, 6; McHenry, 2; Kane, 0; Will, 0.

Welcome to the South Lake Mosquito Abatement District (SLMAD) Website.  Here you will find information about mosquitoes, the dangers they pose, and how to help prevent them.  If you have questions or comments regarding this website, please contact us.

Resources

  • Larval Site Survey Scheduled

    As part of the ongoing larval surveillance program the Southlake Mosquito Abatement District will be performing a helicopter survey for inactive, unkempt or abandoned “green” swimming pools that may be breeding grounds for Culex mosquitoes in the district on Wednesday or Thursday afternoon, July 24 or 25th, of this week.  Culex mosquitoes are the primary carriers of West Nile Virus.  The pools are referred to as “green pools” because we many times find them algae-choked because of inactive filters, often with leaves or other debris, resulting in green to blackish-colored water.  These pools are not properly maintained with filtration and chemicals.  Pools which are maintained properly with filtration and chemicals will NOT breed mosquitoes.

    No adult mosquito control (Spraying) or larval control applications are being made from the helicopter during this survey.

     

    If you have any questions, please feel free to email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

     

  • Aerial Spraying Completed

    The aerial spraying which was scheduled for 7/11/2013 has been completed.

     

    If you have any questions, please feel free to email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

     

  • Frequently Asked Questions about Aerial Spraying

    Why is an aerial application taking place?

    The South Lake Mosquito Abatement District conducts a mosquito control program that is science-based, with various threshold triggers that call for different treatments based on surveillance, i.e., trap counts. With the recent rains, mosquito populations have climbed to levels that go beyond nuisance and threaten quality of life for our residents.


    What time is the application?

    The application is scheduled to occur after dusk, approximately 8:40 p.m. Because mosquito control is weather-dependent, wind speeds on the ground and in the air may impact our application times.

     

    What products are being used?

    The product we are using is Duet, which is registered and approved by the EPA for use in this type of application. A very small amount of active ingredient is used — about a tablespoon treating an acre. The droplets are configured to interact with a mosquito's physiology, and the application is not expected to impact on beneficial insects, pets or people. The last time an aerial application took place we saw about 85 percent reduction in mosquito populations.

     

    Do I need to take special precautions? Cover my gardens? Stay indoors?

    The product we will be using during our aerial mosquito control application has no re-entry restrictions, and residents do not need to take any special actions during the application. The product breaks down very quickly in the environment and has no residual effect. There is no particular concern for fruits and vegetables, though it’s prudent to wash any home-grown food before eating. There is no need to cover ornamental plants.

     

    Is this harmful to bees and beneficial insects?

    These mosquito applications will be conducted during the evening when mosquitoes are most active and bees have returned to the hive. The product dissipates and breaks down quickly in the environment, and when bees emerge in morning hours, they are not impacted.

     

    Is this harmful to aquatic life and waterways?

    At the dosage rates and droplet configuration used in this operation, there is no risk of contamination of lakes, streams and waterways and there should be no impact to aquatic life. The product is approved for use directly over water to target adult mosquitoes.

     

    For any additional questions, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

  • West Nile Virus 2013

    From WIFR.COM: SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) has confirmed the first West Nile virus positive bird reported in Illinois for 2013. The Monroe County Health Department collected a West Nile virus positive starling on June 27, 2013 in Waterloo.

    “We are now starting to see West Nile virus in both mosquitoes and birds, which means it’s only a matter of time before we start seeing West Nile virus in people,” said Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck. “Remember to protect yourself by wearing insect repellent and getting rid of any standing water around your home.”

    As of Sept. 12: Three human West Nile virus cases have been reported by the Illinois Department of Public Health to date, one each in McHenry, Morgan, and Tazewell counties. Thirteen mosquito batches have been positive for West Nile in Lake County, 3 of which have been in Deerfield. In neighboring counties, West Nile positive mosquito batches reported to date are: Cook County, 1089; DuPage, 105; Kane, 9; McHenry, 13, Will, 27. It's important to protect yourself from mosquito bites.

    As of Sept. 25, Illinois has had 27 human cases of West Nile Virus reported, and two deaths.  In the 6-county area, 8 cases and one death were reported in Cook County, 2 cases each in Lake and McHenry counties, one in DuPage, and none in Kane or Will counties.  Of the 2468 West Nile-positive birds, mosquitoes, horses and other animals that have been identified in Illinois, here are numbers from the 6-county area:  Cook, 1673; DuPage, 152; Kane, 29; Lake, 32; McHenry, 29; Will, 77.

    Read the rest of the story here and keep yourself safe!

  • West Nile Virus 2012

    This is the worst year for West Nile virus infections in the U.S. since 2002.  As of Aug. 24, 2012 the Illinois Health Department has recorded 41 cases of West Nile virus, with 2 deaths.  About 80% of people bitten by West Nile-carrying mosquitoes have no symptoms, the 20% who do develop symptoms have fever, nausea, muscle aches, and other flu-like symptoms.  At least 19 neuroinvasive cases have been reported, mainly in the 6 county area around Chicago ("neuroinvasive" means that the virus has caused paralysis, or encephalitis or meningitis, all with the probability of leaving the person with long-lasting or permanent nerve damage or memory loss).

    There is no vaccine to protect against West Nile virus, and anti-viral medicines are ineffective.  The best way to keep from being infected is to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes.  Current preventive measures in South Lake Mosquito Abatement District include frequent and on-going surveillance, larvaciding and adultciding.

    Preventive strategies include (click Read More below to see them):

    Read more...

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Latest Events

District Board Meeting And Tentative Budget Appropriation Ordinance Meeting

May 12, 2014

Category: Meetings

Official meeting of the Southlake Mosquito Abatement District board of commissioners.

District Board Meeting

June 09, 2014

Category: Meetings

Official meeting of the Southlake Mosquito Abatement District board of commissioners.

District Board Meeting

July 14, 2014

Category: Meetings

Official meeting of the Southlake Mosquito Abatement District board of commissioners.