Remove Standing Water!

A small amount of standing water will serve the purpose for mosquitoes to breed.  Mosquito eggs and larvae can develop in any amount of standing water....

West Nile Virus Stats

As of Sept. 5, 2014, 691 mosquito batches have tested positive for West Nile Virus across Illinois.  There have been 22 positive birds, 40 counties with positive humans, birds, or mosquitoes, and two human cases of neurologic West Nile.  In the South Lake Mosquito Abatement District, West Nile-positive mosquito batches have been found in trap collections in Riverwoods, Deerfield, Highland Park, and Ft. Sheridan.  To prevent mosquito bites, both adults and children should use repellents and/or wear light-colored clothes with long sleeves and long pants when outside, especially in the early morning or evening.

Welcome to the South Lake Mosquito Abatement District (SLMAD) Website.  Here you will find information about mosquitoes, the dangers they pose, and how to help prevent them.  If you have questions or comments regarding this website, please contact us.

Resources

  • Quick and Easy Repellant

    Click on the link below to read an article about a mosquito repellant that you probably already own!

     

    Stay safe everyone!

     

    http://www.ivillage.com/best-mosquito-repellant-ever-something-you-already-own/7-a-541766

  • Clarke Program Update

    The Clarke Program update report is attached.

     

    If you have any questions, please feel free to email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

     

  • Does a West Nile Virus Vaccine Exist?

    There is no vaccine to protect against West Nile virus, and anti-viral medicines are ineffective.  The best way to keep from being infected is to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes.  Current preventive measures in South Lake Mosquito Abatement District include frequent and on-going surveillance, larvaciding and adultciding.

    Preventive strategies include (click Read More below to see them):

    Read more...
  • Mosquito Control Methods

    This is a video from Clarke regarding Integrated Mosquito Management Service Program techniques.

    Dim lights Integrated Mosquito Management Service Program By Clarke
  • Biology

    Mosquito Egg Raft

    Mosquito Egg Raft

    Many mosquitoes, such as Culex quinquefasciatus, lay their eggs on the surface of fresh or stagnant water. The water may be in tin cans, barrels, horse troughs, ornamental ponds, swimming pools, puddles, creeks, ditches, catch basins or marshy areas. Mosquitoes prefer water sheltered from the wind by grass and weeds.

    Culex mosquitoes usually lay their eggs at night over a period of time sticking them together to form a raft of from 100 to 300 eggs. A raft of eggs looks like a speck of soot floating on the water and is about 1/4 inch long and 1/8 inch wide. A female mosquito may lay a raft of eggs every third night during its life span.

    Anopheles and many other mosquitoes lay their eggs singly on the water surface. Aedes and Ochlerotatus mosquitoes lay their eggs singly, usually on damp soil. Aedes and Ochlerotatus eggs are more resistant to drying out (some require complete drying out before the eggs will hatch) and hatch only when flooded with water (salt water high tides, irrigated pastures, treeholes flooded by rains, flooded stream bottoms). Anopheles , Culex and Mansonia eggs are susceptible to long periods of drying out.

    Tiny mosquito larvae (1st instar) emerge from the eggs within 24 - 48 hours almost in unison.

    Mosquito Larva

    Mosquito Larvae

    Mosquito larvae, commonly called "wigglers," live in water from 4 to 14 days depending on water temperature.

    Larvae must come to the surface at frequent intervals to obtain oxygen through a breathing tube called a siphon. They are constantly feeding since maturation requires a huge amount of energy and food. They hang with their heads down and the brushes by their mouths filtering anything small enough to be eaten toward their mouths to nourish the growing larvae. They feed on algae, plankton, fungi and bacteria and other microorganisms. They breath at the water surface with the breathing tube up breaking the water surface tension. One mosquito species larva feeds on larvae of other mosquitoes: Toxorhynchites, the largest mosquito known, are predators of other mosquito larvae sharing their habitat. Their larvae are much larger than other mosquito larvae.

     

    Read more...

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Latest Events

District Board Meeting

November 10, 2014

Category: Meetings

Official meeting of the Southlake Mosquito Abatement District board of commissioners.